Cascade 1.2.0.1069 Manual: The Cascade Windows Explorer Shell Extension

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Table of Contents:

  1. Introduction to the Shell Extension
  2. Authentication and Authentication Caching
  3. Context Menu Commands
    1. Clone Last Known Good
    2. Clone Latest
    3. Clone
    4. Update to Last Known Good
    5. Update to Latest
    6. Update
    7. Delete Tree
    8. Lock
    9. Unlock
    10. Log
    11. Blame
    12. Diff
    13. Revert
    14. Merge
    15. Skip Merge
    16. Checkpoint/Commit
    17. Cascade Manager
    18. Settings
    19. Help
    20. About
  4. Icon Overlays
  5. "Details" View Column Support

Introduction to the Shell Extension

Cascade provides a Windows Explorer shell extension that allows you to manipulate Cascade trees from the Windows GUI by right-clicking on any file or directory on the Cascade File System drive. The Cascade shell extension also provides "icon overlays" to show you which files and directories you've made changes to.

The shell extension provides a subset of the functionality exposed through the command line client—some lesser-used functionality (such as the low-level csc mount command for setting up a CFS tree manually, instead of cloning a tree from Cascade Manager) has been omitted from the shell extension.

Authentication and Authentication Caching

Just like with the command line client, you will sometimes be asked to enter a username and password to access a repository. See the documentation on the command line client for more information.

Context Menu Commands

The context menu will appear when you right-click inside any CFS tree. This includes your own local CFS drive, but it may also appear in a CFS tree shared over a network file system from some other computer.

Depending on where you right-click, Cascade will offer you an appropriate subset of these commands:

Clone Last Known Good

The "Clone Last Known Good" command clones a Cascade tree from the last-known-good revision—that is, the most recent revision where all tasks have completed and passed. Instead of allowing you to choose the name of the tree, this command will automatically select the name of the tree for you, pickingthe first unique unused name "tree1", "tree2", "tree3", etc. (If you want to call the tree something else, you can always rename it.)

Clone Latest

The "Clone Latest" command is similar to "Clone Last Known Good", but clones the tree from the latest revision, regardless of its testing status.

Clone

The "Clone..." command brings up a dialog box asking what sort of tree you'd like to clone, providing more control than the Clone Last Known Good command. You can enter the name of the tree here, as well as select what revision you want to clone. You can select Last Known Good (the most recent revision where all tasks have completed and passed), Latest (the most recent revision, regardless of its testing status), or an explicit numeric revision.

Update to Last Known Good

The "Update to Last Known Good" command updates an existing (previously cloned) tree to the last known good revision.

Update to Latest

The "Update to Latest" command updates an existing (previously cloned) tree to the latest revision.

Update

The "Update..." command brings up a dialog box asking what revision you'd like to update your existing (previously cloned) tree to. The options have the same meaning as in the "Clone..." command.

Delete Tree

The "Delete Tree..." command destroys an existing tree. Deleting a tree with this command is much more efficient than the normal Windows Explorer "Delete" command.

Lock

The "Lock..." command locks a file, preventing other users from committing changes to it. Only one user can hold a lock to any given file at a time. Only administrators can forcibly break locks, i.e., unlock a file locked by another user.

The Lock dialog asks for an optional lock message explaining to other users why the file was locked.

Unlock

The "Unlock" command unlocks a file, allowing other users to committing changes to it again. Only administrators can forcibly break locks, i.e., unlock a file locked by another user.

Log

The "Log..." command shows the history of changes to a file in a Cascade tree.

Blame

The "Blame..." command shows the most recent change that modified each line in a file in a Cascade tree. The first column shows the revision number of the change, while the second column shows the change's author.

Diff

The "Diff..." command shows what changes have been made to a file in a Cascade tree.

This command relies on an external diff program specified in the CSC_DIFF configuration variable. CSC_DIFF contains a template for a command line used to launch that program, where %B is replaced by the path to the "baseline" file and %Y is replaced by the path to "your" file. If CSC_DIFF is not set, its default value is diff -u %B %Y.

The Windows installer for Cascade sets CSC_DIFF to launch the TortoiseMerge diff program.

Revert

The "Revert..." command backs out unwanted changes to a Cascade tree, rolling the file in question back to its original state in the repository. If you select a directory rather than a file, the revert is recursive, applying to all files and subdirectories underneath it as well.

Merge

The "Merge..." command merges your changes to a file in a Cascade tree with other people's changes to the same file. This is often required after an "Update" command.

This command relies on an external diff program specified in the CSC_MERGE configuration variable. CSC_MERGE contains a template for a command line used to launch that program, where %B is replaced by the path to the "baseline" file, %Y is replaced by the path to "your" file, %T is replaced by the path to "their" file, and %O is replaced by the path to the output file. If CSC_MERGE is not set, its default value is diff3 -m %Y %B %T >%O.

The Windows installer for Cascade sets CSC_MERGE to launch the TortoiseMerge diff program.

Skip Merge

The "Skip Merge..." command marks a file as not needing to be merged, without launching an external merge utility. This effectively wipes out the other users' changes to the file in favor of your own changes.

Checkpoint/Commit

The "Checkpoint/Commit..." command both shows you the current state of the tree and allows you to create a checkpoint or commit your changes.

The Checkpoint/Commit dialog shows what files and directories have been modified in the this Cascade tree, including information on which ones the user needs to merge to make the tree consistent. It also shows all the mount points in the current tree. Each row in the table has three fields: the path to the mount point, the URL of the repository the mount point refers to, and the revision that mount point is set to.

If you click the Cancel button to close the dialog, no action will be taken. Otherwise, if you click OK, you can select whether you want to create a checkpoint only; create a checkpoint and launch the tasks affected by your changes; or attempt to commit your changes.

By default all edited files will be checkpointed. You can checkpoint a subset of the edited files using the checkboxes to the left of the files.

Before checkpointing or committing, you can also write up a human-readable description of your change here.

Cascade Manager

The "Cascade Manager..." command brings up Cascade Manager in your web browser.

Settings

The "Settings..." command brings up a dialog box where you can modify some of Cascade's configuration settings.

Help

The "Help..." command brings up this manual in your web browser.

About

The "About..." command displays a brief dialog box showing what version of Cascade you are running.

Icon Overlays

The Cascade shell extension adds "icon overlays" to Cascade trees in Windows Explorer. These icon overlays indicate what state a file is in. There are six possible states:

normal icon The green checkbox icon indicates that a file has not been changed from its original state in the repository.
modified icon The red exclamation point indicates that a file or directory tree has been modified in some way from its original state in the repository.
added icon The blue plus sign indicates that a file or directory did not exist in the repository and has been added in the local tree.
conflict icon The yellow exclamation point indicates that a file has been modified in both the local tree and the repository and the two sets of changes need to be merged. For a directory tree, it indicates that at least one file under the directory tree needs a merge.
ignored icon The grey dash indicates that a file has been modified, but that the changes are being ignored due to its name matching one of the patterns in the CFS_IGNORE configuration variable or a pattern in a .cfs_ignore file.
locked icon The padlock indicates that you have locked this file for exclusive editing. Note that there is no icon indicating that another user has locked the file, but you can determine this by attempting to lock the file yourself.

Icon overlays will reduce Explorer's performance somewhat. If you don't want the icon overlays, you can disable them in the "Settings..." dialog.

"Details" View Column Support

The Cascade shell extension adds support for the following columns to Windows Explorer's "Details" view.

You can select which columns are displayed by right-clicking on the column headers.


Comments or questions about the manual? Please email info@conifersystems.com with your feedback.

Copyright © 2008 Conifer Systems LLC. All rights reserved.

Cascade contains valuable trade secrets and other confidential information belonging to Conifer Systems LLC. This software and its associated documentation may not be copied, duplicated or disclosed to third parties without the express written permission of Conifer Systems LLC.